7.13.2015

ON PRETENDING AND PULPITEERING

The Pretender in the Pulpit

In his excellent book, “The Courage to be Protestant”, David Wells opens chapter two with a startling account of an Easter worship service.  Wells writes, “It’s Easter morning 2006. And there lurking in the shadows, is a figure rarely seen in church. It’s Superman. Yes, Superman! He who leaps tall buildings in a single bound as he pursues evildoers.  No, wait a minute. It’s not him. Actually it’s only the senior pastor all decked out as Superman ready to communicate the gospel to a new generation…”  If this were playing on my MP3 player I’d hit stop at this point.  Does that really occur anymore? Seriously?  I think enough critique has happened by now that people have told their senior pastor to take off the Superman mask.  Aren’t we done now with the superficial, ear-tickling pastor? 
I have for some time been concerned that many churchgoers view the megachurch practices as so far out there that ignorance now prevails among Christians as to how subtle Satan is working in churches that claim to hold fast the truth.  More needs to be said of what I have observed as artificial imitation or, as Martyn Lloyd Jones used to call it, pulpiteering, in churches that are proud of their doctrinal heritage.  Did you know that a preacher could be nothing more than a good actor? I’m hoping this brief write-up will help the churchgoer to be able to distinguish between those ministries that are sincere from those that are artificial imitations.  There is a great difference between preaching and pretending to preach. 


Who Was That Masked Man?
Philip Doddridge in his work “On the Delivery of Sermons” provides an extensive warning against theatrical preaching and its destructive consequences in the life of the church. Theatrical preaching occurs when a preacher attempts to “transport into the views, the feelings, and the circumstances of the person represented.”  Theatrical preaching is the practice of acting what one is saying. It’s extremely detrimental to the spiritual life of the church.